Whenever I would speak to my Uncle Stan, he would ask if the husband had gotten any rabbits lately. Sadly, Uncle Stan passed away (at the amazing age of 91!) in February. So, when the husband headed out Thumper hunting on Saturday, we knew that should he get one, it would be for Stan. In fact, the awesome hat he’s rocking in his picture was Stan’s. He would have been really proud to hear about the trip and how delicious that little bunny was.

Rabbit has the reputation for being tricky to cook, but this most recent recipe was probably the easiest, and best, we have ever had.

First, you need to brine your bunny for a day in salt water to tenderize and help remove the iron-y blood taste from the game. After that you’re ready to go. Break down the legs and remove the rib cage. The back strap is one of the best parts of any animal, so to minimize the chance of ruining it, I leave the entire back column intact. Obviously we aren’t running a fancy french restaurant out of our kitchen, so I’m not concerned with presentation. Remove tough silver skin with a sharp knife and you’re basically done.

In a large pot, brown the rabbit pieces in 2 TB or so of oil for about 3 minutes on each side, set aside.

  • Add 1 whole chopped onion to the pot and saute until soft – about 5 minutes. Add 3 cloves chopped garlic and cook until fragrant – about 1 more minute.
  • Add 2 cups chicken broth to the onion and garlic mixture, toss in a bay leaf and a sprig of thyme if that’s your thing. Liberally pepper the broth.
  • Add rabbit to the broth mixture and quickly bring to boil. As soon as it has boiled turn the setting to low, cover, and slowly simmer for 35 – 45 minutes. Low and slow is the way to go with rabbit lest you turn it to leather.

When your rabbit is finished, remove from the pot and set aside.

  • In a separate container, create a slurry with 1/4 cup flour, 1/4 cup lemon juice and 5 TB water.
  • Shake to mix well, and add to the remaining broth and onion mixture. Bring to boil while stirring. Remove from heat once it has boiled.
  • Spoon the gravy over your rabbit and viola! What’s up Doc?!

You may think that the lemon sounds insane (I did the same thing) but it is a surprisingly delicious touch. A high note of citrus that really elevates the rabbit to a different level.

I also serve my rabbit with carrots (these were grown in our urban garden this summer and roasted with olive oil, salt & pepper) – because I find it hilarious. And of course, delicious.


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Each year I carve a pumpkin. And each year I forget how much work it really is. Though, in the end it’s always worth it. 

This year I took a stab at Mrs Doubtfire. My mother is a big fan of the line “help is on the way!!” And uses it often. So, Doubtfire. Duh. 

I think the old girl turned out pretty well. What do you think?

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I love pasta. A lot. It’s like bread but in a different form and with more seafood (because always seafood). I had the best lobster ravioli of my life in a fabulous little bistro in Boston a few years ago, and I still dream of it. The key? The vodka cream sauce. So I thought it was about damn time to start making some of this cream sauce myself. And you know what? It’s super easy. The only part of this recipe that a well stocked kitchen may not contain at any given time is cream. Otherwise, I know most of us are ready to bang this out with little to no notice.

  • Saute 2 chopped garlic cloves, 1/2 cup chopped onion and 1/4 cup minced shallots in butter – 3 to 5 minutes to bring out the flavor
  • Add 1 TB tomato paste to the pan along with a generous dash of red pepper flakes (depending on preference for level of heat) and cook until you can smell the spice (1 to 2 minutes)
  • Remove your pan from the heat and stir in 1 cup of freshly sliced tomatoes (I use the little guys from the garden – so good!) and 1/3 cup vodka
  • At this point you are going to cook it all down until the alcohol cooks off (7 to 10 minutes)
  • If you want your sauce to be super smooth, you can pour it into a blender. I leave it with the little chunks – the texture is an added bonus
  • Slowly add 1/2 cup of heavy cream to your sauce (because healthy and delicious) and heat until warm.
  • Salt and pepper to taste.

This sauce is pretty amazeballs right out of the pan, but if you have guests or someone who may judge you, I suggest pouring it over linguine with garlic butter sauteed shrimp. And of course, green onions to garnish because duh.

See? Easy. Now I’m hungry…

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The dinner project is going really well. I love all the pics!


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I grew up on Jiffy mix biscuits. They were a pretty regular fixture at the dinner table and I still have a soft spot in my heart for those (mom used a cutter for round biscuits, and dad just dropped them from the spoon). However, we don’t buy Jiffy in our house, so when it’s time to make the perfect biscuit, a little elbow grease is involved.

  • Mix 2 cups flour, 1/4 tsp baking soda, 1 TB baking powder and 1 tsp salt in a bowl
  • Cut in 6 TB very cold butter until it makes a mealy mix
  • Add 1 cup buttermilk and mix until just combined (over mixing is bad)
  • Turn out onto a floured surface and press until it’s about half an inch thick. Fold the dough over on itself and press again.
  • Repeat the folding process 4 times (this is how you get all those awesome flaky layers)
  • Cut with a cutter and bake in a 450* oven for 10-12 minutes



Making the gravy and meaty bits is super easy. Thanks to my friend Colour who turned us on to doing this in the same pan a year or so ago, a process  that was already pretty idiot proof got even easier.

  • Brown 1 pound ground pork or the sausage of your choice
  • Sprinkle cooked meat (don’t drain! Keep the oil and fat because, healthy!! And delicious…!) with 2 TB flour
  • Slowly add 1 1/2 cups milk and stir to thicken
  • Sprinkle with salt and liberally apply pepper
  • Make sure your husband walks by and adds more pepper
  • Add more pepper yourself (we like our pepper)
  • When thick, spoon over your biscuits and unhinge your face

I bet you didn’t think biscuits and gravy could be that easy, eh?

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Do you remember the days of LiveJournal? Or am I the only one and I’m totally dating myself here…? There was a group, or an event, or something like that called “Day in the Life” and I remember DITL to be awesome and fun. So here we go. I thought I would do a quick post with shots from my day.


A letter heading to MA. I am desperately behind on my correspondence, but slowly but surely catching up. I love sending and receiving mail. Seriously. It’s a disease.

Betty White loves to lick the water in the tub after a shower. Not the brightest…

Always coffee…

New O2 regulator. Wrong wrench to tighten. Story of my life. 

The Dr Who scarf is coming along quite well! Only 3 more feet to go!

Harvest from the shop’s urban garden today. Not bad!

I went to Michael’s for a single skein of yarn….but we all know how that ended.


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I’m kind of a dill pickle snob. Well, no. I should own it. I am a dill pickle snob. Always have been – ask my mother. And those sweet pickle things people eat? Ick. So, imagine my hesitation when my outdoor cucumber plants that folks said would never grow in Alaska started to produce lots of little baby pickling cukes. What do I do with these now? Make pickles? But they will be gross? The  horror!

I decided to take a stab at a simple dill pickle recipe and lo and behold – it’s awesome. We broke into the first of many jars a few weeks ago and they are super delicious. And this is coming from me. Me! The pickle snob!


  • Wash and scrub the little nubs from your tiny cukes and set aside. Make sure of course to remove all blossoms from the cuke – it will cause gross stuff to happen later.
  • Clean and sterilize a jar the appropriate size for your pickles (lots of little jelly jars this year as this is about the amount of what was available at once in the garden.) ** Pickling cucumbers larger than your thumb will begin to get bitter – pick when smaller.
  • Husk and smash 2 cloves of garlic and add lots of dill from the garden – add dried or fresh peppers as per your preferance
  • Pack all into the jar of your choice.


 On the stove, bring to boil: 1 1/2 cups water, 1/2 cup white vinegar and 1 1/2 TB pickling salt. Remove from heat as soon as it boils, and pour into your jar (you can of course cut the recipe in half or add other complicated math depending on how much solution you need). Immediately cap the jar and set on the counter. The top should pop within a few hours and voila! Your jar is sealed and your pickles are good for the next few months. I would advise letting them sit for 2-3 weeks before you break in, just to make sure they absorb that delicious dilly and garlicky goodness. Refrigerate after opening. Stuff face. Repeat.

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