easy.wild.rabbit

Whenever I would speak to my Uncle Stan, he would ask if the husband had gotten any rabbits lately. Sadly, Uncle Stan passed away (at the amazing age of 91!) in February. So, when the husband headed out Thumper hunting on Saturday, we knew that should he get one, it would be for Stan. In fact, the awesome hat he’s rocking in his picture was Stan’s. He would have been really proud to hear about the trip and how delicious that little bunny was.

Rabbit has the reputation for being tricky to cook, but this most recent recipe was probably the easiest, and best, we have ever had.

First, you need to brine your bunny for a day in salt water to tenderize and help remove the iron-y blood taste from the game. After that you’re ready to go. Break down the legs and remove the rib cage. The back strap is one of the best parts of any animal, so to minimize the chance of ruining it, I leave the entire back column intact. Obviously we aren’t running a fancy french restaurant out of our kitchen, so I’m not concerned with presentation. Remove tough silver skin with a sharp knife and you’re basically done.

In a large pot, brown the rabbit pieces in 2 TB or so of oil for about 3 minutes on each side, set aside.

  • Add 1 whole chopped onion to the pot and saute until soft – about 5 minutes. Add 3 cloves chopped garlic and cook until fragrant – about 1 more minute.
  • Add 2 cups chicken broth to the onion and garlic mixture, toss in a bay leaf and a sprig of thyme if that’s your thing. Liberally pepper the broth.
  • Add rabbit to the broth mixture and quickly bring to boil. As soon as it has boiled turn the setting to low, cover, and slowly simmer for 35 – 45 minutes. Low and slow is the way to go with rabbit lest you turn it to leather.

When your rabbit is finished, remove from the pot and set aside.

  • In a separate container, create a slurry with 1/4 cup flour, 1/4 cup lemon juice and 5 TB water.
  • Shake to mix well, and add to the remaining broth and onion mixture. Bring to boil while stirring. Remove from heat once it has boiled.
  • Spoon the gravy over your rabbit and viola! What’s up Doc?!

You may think that the lemon sounds insane (I did the same thing) but it is a surprisingly delicious touch. A high note of citrus that really elevates the rabbit to a different level.

I also serve my rabbit with carrots (these were grown in our urban garden this summer and roasted with olive oil, salt & pepper) – because I find it hilarious. And of course, delicious.

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2 Comments

Filed under yummy eats

2 responses to “easy.wild.rabbit

  1. Pingback: easy.wild.rabbit | Rifleman III Journal

  2. For us rabbit is a necessity.
    Living on a fixed wage, prices going up the whole time,
    I put free meat on the table at least once a week.
    Only we try not to shoot preferring snares.

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